Thursday, January 9, 2014

What's up at Mossy Bank?

Greetings!   This blog was established to allow readers of the column "What's Up at Mossy Bank Park" appearing in the Steuben Courier Advocate and the Waterside Weekly to make comments, ask questions, or otherwise respond to the content of that column.  Randy will do his best to keep up with these communications and answer questions.  Thanks for your response.   

18 comments:

  1. Hello Dr. Weidner,

    First off, I'd like to thank you for all your efforts regarding the details involved with our surroundings when we take a hike in and around Mossy Bank Park. Your articles in the Courier Advocate are a great resource. I'm a great observer of nature, and visit the park very often, yet somehow miss many of the birds, bugs and animals that you see. I'm working to sharpen my eye(s) as a result!

    Regarding your last Courier Advocate article, I too have an interest in the Bath bald eagle activities. It may just be my luck, but I have seen a good bit of activity recently.

    Specifically, on Jan. 31st, I observed both bald eagles active around and on the nest. But since then, the ~ 6" of snow have fallen and I haven't seen them on the nest again, as of yet.

    In the days to come, I'll be checking to see if the eagles are working to clear the nest for the upcoming breeding season. I will also post (here on the Eagle Watch web page) any good photos I get of our Bath bald eagles - as long as they cooperate! lol

    S C Wise

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  2. I also have seen Bald Eagles in the area but I do not think you can assume they are the same birds that nested there the past few years. If this were late February, that would be different. The female started sitting on the nest at the very end of February last year. Keep watching. Randy

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  3. Making sure I've entered the blog correctly to comment on how much I enjoyed the tribute to Ted Markham this week. May his vision live on to the seventh generation

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  4. Thanks for your above reply Randy! I've been wondering if any of the bald eagles I've been seeing might be the, now mature (4-5 year old), offspring of our mating pair?

    According to information I've read, the young ones do return to the general area of where they first fledged. In past years I have seen an immature bald eagle flying around Mossy Bank during the late winter and spring - and other times not linked to their fledging period. In fact, only a few days ago I saw what I'm nearly certain was an immature bald eagle just above Mossy Bank ridge - being chased eastward by a crow/raven.

    As to whether the bald eagles I saw recently (on the nest) were our local pair, . . . have a look on the Eagle Watch page here. I've just gotten pictures put up that I captured back on Jan. 31st. I would doubt that an interloping pair of bald eagles would be occupying our local pair's nest site. On the other hand, it would be GREAT if we now have two mating pairs of bald eagles in the area!

    S C Wise

    PS - Thanks from me, as well, on your piece on Ted Markham. It's great to have folks like him around. He will be missed but most definitely also remembered.

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  5. The reason I have been skeptical about some of these winter Bald Eagles being "our" mating pair is that these birds will move south in winter. What probably happens is the whole population of birds shifts south, so those we see in late fall and early winter used to live farther north.

    I agree the immature eagles seen in spring may well have been from an earlier local nesting. The more recent pictures of the two adult birds on the nest could be "our" local pair. I suspect local conditions may dictate just when nesting begins in any given year. Keep watching for more consistent sightings at the nest. If you get real lucky, you may see the aerial grasping of talons and tumbling indicative of mating, after which one bird (they take turns) will be sitting in the nest constantly until the eggs hatch.

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  6. Randy, Love your column. This weeks reminded me of the way to tell the temperature by counting cricket chirps. Count the number of chirps in 14 seconds and add 40 to it to tell the temperature in Fahrenheit degrees. Also I finished reading David McCullough's MORNINGS ON HORSEBACK, where Teddy Roosevelt became obsessed with Natural History and the scientific names of inspects and other creatures.

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  7. Thanks. Sorry to take so long to reply, but this site has not been too active and I have not been checking regularly enough. I do read several Naturalists and get good information and ideas from them. I have not yet read MORNINGS ON HORSEBACK, but I intend to look into it. Tanks Karl.

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  8. Hi, Randy,

    I have taken to reading your column in the Courier-Advocate. The last column about spiders was especially interesting.

    I have read that one is never six feet distance from a spider at any time. We travel in our motorhome, and we have several pet spiders in it. They are mostly the green-eyed jumping spiders. They come out in the evening to hunt.

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  9. Hi Randy,

    I would like to contact you to discuss an opportunity of having you come to the VAMC Bath to present information to our Veterans for our fly-fishing program. Please contact me if you would be interested in presenting again. Beth Cuer - 607-664-4470 - Recreation Therapy

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  10. Your column is much appreciated for the quality of your observations. I recently found a most unusual nest for its size. It is too large for a hummingbird and too small for any other bird I know of. Unfortunately it was not found in situ but on my driveway and suspiciously near to bobcat tracks. The nest measures 1.5 inches in diameter and barely over 1 inch in height. The nest is composed of loose but uniformly laid fine strips of vegetative strands with a small uniformly round pocket 3/4" in diameter about 1/2" deep. Could it be a ground dwelling mammal? I suspect it might have been carried to the driveway by our resident bobcat.

    WWW

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  11. Wayne,
    I'm sorry to answer so late, I'm having trouble with this blog. I suspect the nest you saw was from a White-footed Deermouse, possibly preyed upon by the Bobcat.

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  12. Hi Randy, In reply to your most recent column about the Birch Polypore, wasn't it also found to be a cure for the worms he had in his intestines? That he was using it as such was not established. Just an additional tidbit that readers might find interesting and possibly helpful! Garrett

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  13. Garrett, Thanks for the comment. The potential vermicidal properties are indeed interesting, but it may be presumptuous to think, and impossible to know, that Otzi knew about it. Randy

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  14. Hi Randy:
    Love your column. Would love to do a nature walk with you and my granddaughter age 7, who is a very interested in nature. Are you available at any time over June 23 to 25?
    Ray

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  15. Ray, Sorry I did not get your message sooner. As you may have noticed, rarely does anyone write here, so I do not check it often. I see I passed your time interval for a walk, and most of July is NOT good for me. Perhaps we could go in August. You would be better to call me directly at 607-776-7424. Randy

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  16. So now the bank is in liquidation. What does this mean? Basically a liquidator will be appointed to determine what assets the bank has, liquidate what can be profitably liquidated and then see how much money is left. guarantor loans

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  17. Nice post. I was checking constantly this blog and I’m impressed! Extremely useful info specially the last part I care for such information a lot. I was seeking this certain info for a long time.
    Bath
    Thank you and good luck.

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